Vermilion Ohio News #History


Vermilion was once known as the "Village of Lake Captains," and no other place has so many captains' homes in its historic district. Vermilion was initially settled in the early 19th century and formed as a village in 1837. In 1840, the US Corps of Engineers finished building the tow piers at the mouth of the Vermilion which provided the depth builders needed to take boats into the lake. Thus began the "Golden Age of Ship Building" on the river, in tune with great demand for the shipping on the lakes.

The woollybear wackiness all started more than three decades ago. Northeast Ohio TV weatherman Dick Goddard of Fox8 TV in Cleveland talked with some friends and co-workers about his idea of a celebration built around using the woollybear to forecast what kind of winter is ahead. In 1972 the newly-elected officers of the Parent Teachers Association at the Firelands-Florence Township Elementary School.

Looking for a fun, socially-distanced activity this fall? Look no further! Enjoy the beauty and history that Brownhelm has to offer all from the safety and comfort of your own vehicle. The Brownhelm Historical Association is offering a driving tour of historic houses and locations along North Ridge Road featuring costumed narrators who will share with you the story of these places.

The 7th Annual If Tombstones Could Talk Cemetery Walk takes place on Sunday, October 4, 2020 from 3 pm to 6 pm at Brownhelm Cemetery hosted by Brownhelm Historical Association. Come stroll once again through the Brownhelm Cemetery where you will step back in time and meet some of Brownhelm’s earliest pioneers and residents. You'll hear stories from tour regulars like Colonel Henry Brown, who will share the history of how Brownhelm came to be.

History tells us that the Erie Indians lived along the south shore of Lake Erie until their murderous extinction by the warlike Iroquois from upper New York State in 1655. Then around 1700 the Ottawas, Hurons (Wyandottes) and Chippewas gradually returned to the area for furs to sell to the French traders until they too were pushed out of their hunting and trapping grounds by the pioneering white man.

John Mercer Langston was one of the most extraordinary men of the 19th century. Slim and debonair, and of mixed-raced parentage, Langston was highly educated, an expert in constitutional law, a community organizer and a gifted orator who sought to unify a divided country after the Civil War. He was the first African-American elected to a local office, winning the office of Clerk of Brownhelm Township.

Louis Wells, a Cleveland contractor, began the Vermilion Lagoons project as a means of keeping his men busy during the Great Depression of the 1930s. By 1931 the first house and the beach house had been built and the lagoons were dredged and most of the wooden piling secured. The first house was located just to the south and west of the beach house on the Erie Lagoon and belonged to a Mr. Comstock.

In the aftermath of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the American people demonstrated that in times of hardship, the values that define us do not simply endure -- they are stronger than ever. As a Nation, we responded to unthinkable tragedy with an outpouring of service and goodwill. On that dark day, first responders rushed into a burning Pentagon.

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country. The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed in 1885 and 1886. From these, a movement developed to secure state legislation.

This first school in Brownhelm Township Ohio was opened by Mrs. Harriet Alverson in her own house in the summer of 1819, an 18 x 22 structure built of log on the brow of the hill called Strut Street School. Harriet's husband, William Alverson, was born August 18, 1784 in Holland, sailed from Amsterdam with his widowed mother and two brothers when he was ten years old. They settled in Poughkeepsie, New York. When he was a young man, he moved to Stockbridge, Massachusetts.

During the Revolutionary War in the late 1700s many Connecticut residents were burned out of their homes by the raiding British. To compensate these citizens for their losses, the Connecticut Assembly awarded the "Sufferers" 500,000 acres in the western most portion of the Western Reserve, which came to be known as the Firelands. Settlement was slow due to the remoteness of the tract and the difficulties in reaching it.

Captain William Austin was a man of energy and built the first schooner along the river in 1812. She was the FRIENDSHIP, a schooner of the times, about a fifty footer registered at 57 tons in Cleveland in 1817. Solomon Parsons built the second schooner, the VERMILION, in 1814 and registered in Detroit at 36 tons about 40 feet. Where these ships were built is not exactly known but the builders chose a flat place along the riverside.