In May of 1816 began an event that has been referred to as the “Year without Summer” in New England. Frost had killed off most of the crops that had been planted; soon most of New England was gripped by the cold front. There was widespread loss of crops with the result of regional malnutrition, starvation, and epidemic.

Phoebe Goodell Judson grew up in Vermillion, Ohio. Her pioneer story begins when she married her husband Holden Allen Judson. After three years of matrimony they both decided "to obtain from the government of The United States a grant of land that "Uncle Sam" had promised.

The Brownhelm Historical Association works to preserve the rich history of Brownhelm, Ohio. This dedicated group of volunteers is restoring local landmarks, saving historic tombstones and plans a variety of community events throughout the year. The mission of the Brownhelm Historical Association is to honor Brownhelm’s rich heritage.

The woollybear wackiness all started more than three decades ago. Northeast Ohio TV weatherman Dick Goddard of Fox8 TV in Cleveland talked with some friends and co-workers about his idea of a celebration built around using the woollybear to forecast what kind of winter is ahead. In 1972 the newly-elected officers of the Parent Teachers Association at the Firelands-Florence Township Elementary School.

The Annual If Tombstones Could Talk Cemetery Walk takes place October 10th, 2021 from 3 pm to 6 pm at Brownhelm Cemetery in Vermilion, Ohio. Come stroll once again through the Brownhelm Cemetery where you will step back in time and meet some of Brownhelm’s earliest pioneers and residents. You’ll hear stories from tour regulars like Colonel Henry Brown, who will share the history of how Brownhelm came to be.

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country. The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed in 1885 and 1886. From these, a movement developed to secure state legislation.

Each year on June 14, we celebrate the birthday of the Stars and Stripes, which came into being on June 14, 1777. At that time, the Second Continental Congress authorized a new flag to symbolize the new Nation, the United States of America.

Juneteenth is the oldest known US celebration of the abolition of the chattel slave system, and the emancipation of enslaved African Americans in Texas. The question of slavery divided the nation during the decades leading up to the Civil War. But by September of 1862, President Abraham Lincoln made abolition a formal position of the US government when he announced the Emancipation Proclamation.

Memorial Day takes place on the last Monday in May to honor all those who died in American wars. The origins of the May holiday go back some 150 years. In 1868, Commander in Chief John A. Logan of the grand Army of the Republic issued what was called General Order Number 11.

President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed May 9, 1914, the first Mother's Day. He asked Americans on that day to give a public "thank you" to their mothers and all mothers. Mother's Day began when Anna Jarvis, of Philadelphia, wanted to remember her own mother.

On Cinco de Mayo, friends and family gather to commemorate the history of the Mexican people and the anniversary of the Battle of Puebla. Cinco de Mayo is Spanish for the Fifth of May. On this day in 1862 Mexican peasants won a battle against French invaders.

Easter is a Christian holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ, one of the foundations upon which the Christian religions are built. Easter is not fixed to a specific day; it falls on the first Sunday after the full moon following March 21st. Easter is the oldest Christian holiday.